CHRONIC WOUNDS

Clinical Studies

TITLE: “Fat Grafting and Adipose-Derived Regenerative Cells in Burn Wound Healing and Scarring: A Systematic Review of the Literature”

SOURCE: Condé-Green A, Marano AA, Lee ES, Reisler T, Price LA, Milner SM, Granick MS. Fat Grafting and Adipose-Derived Regenerative Cells in Burn Wound Healing and Scarring: A Systematic Review of the Literature. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2016 Jan;137(1):302-12.

SUMMARY: A systematic review of the literature was performed by a thorough search of 12 terms using the PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane databases. Two hundred forty-one articles were subject to evaluation by predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Six murine and 12 human studies were selected, including case-control studies, case series, and case reports. They describe histologic and clinical effects of fat grafting and regenerative cell therapy, including improvements in burn scar size and texture, enhanced angiogenesis, decreased inflammation, alleviation of pain, and return of function. There is a dearth of randomized controlled trials and quantitative analysis supporting the efficacy of fat grafting and adipose regenerative cells in burns. However, the subjective improvements in scars are encouraging. The authors hope that this review will be a foundation for future studies and will highlight the breadth of knowledge yet to be explored by this therapy.

PUBLIC DOWNLOAD OF FULL MANUSCRIPT: Not available for public download


TITLE: “Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Adipose Tissue in Clinical Applications for Dermatological Indications and Skin Aging”

SOURCE: Gaur M, Dobke M, Lunyak VV. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Adipose Tissue in Clinical Applications for Dermatological Indications and Skin Aging. Int J Mol Sci. 2017 Jan 20;18(1).

SUMMARY: Operating at multiple levels of control, mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue (ADSCs) communicate with organ systems to adjust immune response, provide signals for differentiation, migration, enzymatic reactions, and to equilibrate the regenerative demands of balanced tissue homeostasis. The identification of the mechanisms by which ADSCs accomplish these functions for dermatological rejuvenation and wound healing has great potential to identify novel targets for the treatment of disorders and combat aging. Herein, we review new insights into the role of adipose-derived stem cells in the maintenance of dermal and epidermal homeostasis, and recent advances in clinical applications of ADSCs related to dermatology.

PUBLIC DOWNLOAD OF FULL MANUSCRIPT: Gaur 2017 PDF


TITLE: “Adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells and platelet-rich plasma: basic and clinical evaluation for cell-based therapies in patients with scars on the face”

SOURCE: Gentile P, De Angelis B, Pasin M, Cervelli G, Curcio CB, Floris M, Di Pasquali C, Bocchini I, Balzani A, Nicoli F, Insalaco C, Tati E, Lucarini L, Palla L, Pascali M, De Logu P, Di Segni C, Bottini DJ, Cervelli V. Adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells and platelet-rich plasma: basic and clinical evaluation for cell-based therapies in patients with scars on the face. J Craniofac Surg. 2014 Jan;25(1):267-72.

SUMMARY: The aim of this article was to describe the preparation and isolation procedures for stromal vascular fraction (SVF), the preparation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and the clinical application in the treatment of the scar on the face. Ten patients with burns sequelae (n = 6) and post-traumatic scars (n = 4) were treated with SVF-enhanced autologous fat grafts obtained by the Celution System. Another 10 patients with burns sequelae (n = 5) and post-traumatic scars (n = 5) were treated with fat grafting based on the Coleman technique mixed with 0.5 mL of PRP.To assess the effects of their treatment, the authors compared their results with those of a control group consisting of 10 patients treated with centrifuged fat. In the patients treated with SVF-enhanced autologous fat grafts, we observed a 63% maintenance of contour restoring after 1 year compared with only 39% of the control group (n = 10) treated with centrifuged fat graft (P < 0.0001). In the patients treated with fat grafting and PRP, we observed a 69% maintenance of contour restoring after 1 year compared with that of the control group (n = 10). Autologous fat grafting is a good method for the correction of scars on the face instead of the traditional scar surgical excision.

PUBLIC DOWNLOAD OF FULL MANUSCRIPT: Not available for public download


TITLE: “Case Report: Industrial X-Ray Injury Treated With Non-Cultured Autologous Adipose-Derived Stromal Vascular Fraction (SVF)”

SOURCE: Iddins CJ, Cohen SR, Goans RE, Wanat R, Jenkins M, Christensen DM, Dainiak N. Case Report: Industrial X-Ray Injury Treated With Non-Cultured Autologous Adipose-Derived Stromal Vascular Fraction (SVF). Health Phys. 2016 Aug;111(2):112-6.

SUMMARY: Local cutaneous injuries induced by ionizing radiation (IR) are difficult to treat. Many have reported local injection of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF), often with additional therapies, as an effective treatment of IR-induced injury even after other local therapies have failed. The authors report a case of a locally recurrent, IR-induced wound that was treated with autologous, non-cultured SVF without other concurrent therapy. A nondestructive testing technician was exposed to 130 kVp x rays to his non-dominant right thumb on 5 October 2011. The wound healed 4 mo after initial conservative therapy with oral/topical α-tocopherol, oral pentoxifylline, naproxen sodium, low-dose oral steroids, topical steroids, hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), oral antihistamines, and topical aloe vera. Remission lasted approximately 17 mo with one minor relapse in July 2012 after minimal trauma and subsequent healing. Aggressive wound breakdown during June 2013 required additional therapy with HBOT. An erythematous, annular papule developed over the following 12 mo (during which time the patient was not undergoing prescribed treatment). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) done more than 2 mo after exposure to IR revealed dose estimates of 14 ± 3 Gy and 19 ± 6 Gy from two centers using different EPR techniques. The patient underwent debridement of the 0.5 cm papular area, followed by SVF injection into and around the wound bed and throughout the thumb without complication. Eleven months post SVF injection, the patient has been essentially asymptomatic with an intact integument. These results raise the possibility of prolonged benefit from SVF therapy without the use of cytokines. Since there is currently no consensus on the use of isolated SVF therapy in chronic, local IR-induced injury, assessment of this approach in an appropriately powered, controlled trial in experimental animals with local radiation injury appears to be indicated.

PUBLIC DOWNLOAD OF FULL MANUSCRIPT: Not available for public download


TITLE: “Adipose-derived Stem Cells Added to Platelet-rich Plasma for Chronic Skin Ulcer Therapy”

SOURCE: Raposio E, Bertozzi N, Bonomini S, Bernuzzi G, Formentini A, Grignaffini E, Pio Grieco M. Adipose-derived Stem Cells Added to Platelet-rich Plasma for Chronic Skin Ulcer Therapy. Wounds. 2016 Apr;28(4):126-31.

SUMMARY: For 18 months, 24 control-group patients with 31 chronic skin ulcers were treated with standard wound care, while 16 experimental-group patients with 21 chronic skin ulcers were treated with standard wound care and 1 e-PRP injection. The patients were randomly assigned to the control or experimental group. Outpatients had weekly follow-up visits where they were subjected to standard treatment and the wound healing process was assessed. At the end of the study, the control and experimental groups had similar healing rates but wound closure rates were significantly different (P = 0.0257): 0.0890 cm(2) x day and 0.2287 cm(2) x day respectively, resulting in a faster recovery for the group treated with e-PRP. No side effects were reported. In the authors' experience, e-PRP significantly enhanced wound closure rates when compared to standard wound care, without causing any serious complications. This finding highlights e-PRP as a valuable resource for chronic wound treatment.

PUBLIC DOWNLOAD OF FULL MANUSCRIPT: Not available for public download